Bookseller Information

ISBN
9781844718733
Extent
44pp
Format
Pamphlet
Publication Date
30-Jul-11
Publication Status
Active
Series
Salt Modern Poets
Subject
Poetry by individual poets
Trim Size
198 x 129mm

The Snowboy

Synopsis

Mark Burnhope's poems present a generous but moral quizzing of the world. Peering out over disability, faith and the host of prejudices that spring from such ground, they negotiate a path through lyricism and music, didacticism and narrative, comedy and confession, slang and slur in their search for a voice with which to speak. They visit town and sea, husband and wife and monuments to grief built of snow, steel, stone. They take us to a hydrotherapy session, a talking tree and an outcast crew including Pinocchio, Queequeg and Quasimodo. But at their heart, there is great warmth. Burnhope asks uncomfortable questions of the rhyme or reason for loss and healing, even as he challenges received perceptions of disabled life with wit, verve and an inclusive imagination.

Praise for this Book

‘Affectionate, hip but not snooty, visionary and anti-square.’ —Ira Lightman

‘Mark Burnhope draws on fairytale and transformation to spin his own techno-mythology in this quirky and intelligent debut.’ —Angela Topping

‘This debut pamphlet introduces a serious and playful, tender and ironic, strong and coherent new voice. A definite talent to watch.’ —Andrew Philip

‘Imagine Zaccheus turning tables at the Internet Café, Paul turning back into Saul, confuse dying with flying, imagine a wheelchair recast in a pastoral landscape. Burnhope speaks movingly of human weakness and physical frailty, of strength and lightness of spirit’ —Helen Ivory

‘Mark Burnhope’s work is concerned with the physical – how a town is a physical place, how we live in a world of machines, our bodies among them. Many of the poems address disability, not only in the narrow sense our culture understands it but also in the wider sense that our physicality acts as a pathetic curb on the life of the spirit. The poems (which are machines themselves, we’ve been told) shake with the joy and frustration of living.’ —Tony Williams





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