Bookseller Information

ISBN
9781784632878
Extent
144pp
Format
Paperback
Publication Date
15-Jul-23
Publication Status
Forthcoming
Series
Salt Modern Stories
Subject
Short stories
Trim Size
178 x 111mm

The Moon is Trending

Series

Name: Salt Modern Stories   Number: 7

Synopsis

‘This new short story collection from Clare Fisher explores of feelings of failure around gender, sexuality, and work, that arise in a success-obsessed capitalist culture. Dazzling, playful, and experimental, it veers between the real, the surreal and the absurd.’

Praise for Previous Work

10 best debut novels by women authors The hints of the “bad thing” that she did keep the reader hooked until the end, where we realise that certain women, no matter how hard they fight, have the odds stacked against them.’ —The Independent

‘A moving, passionate account of someone struggling hard for redemption.’ —The Times

‘A raw and vivid story that clutches at the heart and squeezes tightly.’ —Sunday Express

‘Her new book cements her position as an innovative literary talent … A swirling collection of short stories that moves from fried chicken shops to Tube stations to buffering Skype chats, but never fails to get to the essence of what makes a human tick in the digital age. Her conversational prose style is disarming, and with no story more than four pages in length the book is compulsively readable, often funny, and sometimes unsettling.’ —New Statesman

June’s Best New Books This collection of short stories – some of them very short – explores all aspects of modern life … Fisher’s tales are funny and moving, and you’ll treasure them all.’ —Stylist

‘Part of what makes reading the novel so unsettling is how easy it is for the reader to see the mistakes Beth is making – the warning signs to which she is blind. We know her love for a married older man is not going to end well. At the same time, the author enables us to see how Beth was overwhelmed by the feeling of being loved. The overall trajectory of the book may come as little surprise, but its secrets still have a tremendous power to move and disturb.’ —Gerard Woodward, The Guardian