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Anxiety Before Entering a Room,

Andrew Duncan

Anxiety Before Entering a Room, Andrew Duncan
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BOOKSELLER INFORMATION


Publication Date: 01-Jan-01 | ISBN: 187685703X | Trim Size: 216 x 140 mm | Extent: 136pp | Format: Paperback

UK & International Distribution: Macmillan Distribution | Publishing Status: Active Shop online at HiveFind your local bookshop

 

SYNOPSIS


Synopsis

It’s the tail end of the Seventies, the severity of hypothetical Marxism has given way to the anti-humanism of punk. In a province, someone anglophobe and technophile is attempting to write documentary poetry about the situation at work, where the basic power relations never slip out of mind: an unending cascade of concrete and puzzling problems, of human conjunctures. The real ordinance of society follows an ideology which is secret, covered by a false public one; other forms of consciousness are a shifting set of part-patterns. All around, a generation of English poets are connecting their output to their input. A cultural blockade comes down over all poetry except the most subservient. Filtered expanses of monochrome nuance concealed the fact that nothing was being said. The industrial recession of the Thatcher years lays bare the fragility of every social and psychological structure. Somewhere in the underground of North London, the invisibility allows a constant approximation to popular culture. The infinite compression of punk breaks up into a boundless release, the rediscovery of melody and colour. Melancholic and esoteric virtuosity in deserted spaces is interrupted by a troupe of bedizened dropouts, impossibly nimble and competitive, and is redirected towards bright patched surfaces. The attack by the State and the South on a whole engineering civilisation is protested by the construction of complex symbolic machines. A lucid equivalent of turmoil is not the same as unstable maps of instability.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS


from In a German Hotel (1977—78); 1. Absence; 2. Poem Two; 4. Pissing Blood; 6.; Shape, scored in earth; from Threads of Iron (1980—81); Dead Wind; On First Publication; Black pane and decor ; Dhofar; “Laughing Man”: self-portrait by Richard Gerstl; Turkish Music; In Charnwood; Almond Wind: Lament for Osip Mandelshtam; For an artist having died in his dreams; from Skeleton Looking at Chinese Pictures (1983—87); Hic jacet Borbonius heros; Griffin Carved in Walrus Ivory; Light; About living opposite the Brewery in Brick Lane; The June Sun cast as the absent lover; Those are jewels that were his eyes; Night Train; The metallic autumn; Shapeshifting and Mismatches; from Sound Surface (1992); Jadis j’ai cru; Circular; The Doll’s House; from Surveillance and Compliance (1987—92); Roots of a Revolution; The policy of weakness ; Heat Loss; At Camden Lock; Shiny circuitry; Over and Over ; Fragments of the Above; Dialogue poems; from poems of 1991—6; At Cumae ; Three graves ; 18.4.91: Transparent radiation; For C.; Wind and Wear in Aix-en-Provence; Martyrdom and Triumph of Sergei Korolev; Chronique mondaine of the Fifth Poetry Conference in a Regional Style; from Pauper Estate (1996—9); Looks like luxury and feels like a disease; Adesso non posso ; At the Lido; Collection towards the definition of a word; Least Energy Structures; Snow-puffed plumage

PRAISE FOR THIS BOOK


“[T]he poems range over the planet, through history, across cultures, always with a sense of rootedness in a historical / cultural consciousness.” —Keith Jebb Poetry Review

 

“Duncan has long been known as the editor of the exceptional magazine Angel Exhaust and a feisty controversialist, yet despite seven volumes, his poetry seems to be less known than he is. This book should redress the balance.” —Keith Jebb Poetry Review

 

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE


Andrew DuncanAndrew Duncan was born in 1956, and brought up in the Midlands, “in an atmosphere of technological optimism and class levelling which the South succeeded in reversing thereafter.” He worked as a labourer (in England and Germany) after leaving school, and subsequently as a project planner with a telecomms manufacturer (1978–87), and as a programmer for the Stock Exchange (1988–91).


 
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The Failure of Conservatism in Modern British Poetry, Andrew Duncan

The Failure of Conservatism in Modern British Poetry,

Andrew Duncan

- £70.00
A treatment of 40 years of British poetry from the angle of time. We watch the wonderful helplessness of new poetics as it struggles to free itself from the chrysalis of the old. We watch the life-cycle of new ideas as they open up chaos, channel it into permanent form, and age into predictability and disillusion. We realise the strangeness of the past and go in to sample lost sounds and exotic shapes.
The Imaginary in Geometry, Andrew Duncan

The Imaginary in Geometry,

Andrew Duncan

- £8.99
Duncanís surging and ecstatic poetry draws the wayward connections together into a personal mythology. Ranging wildly through science, technology and history, we see glimmers of secret knowledge and the occult. Here we may find ourselves within the aberrant forms of knowledge, delighting in the sonic showdown of phonemes and ephemera.
The Failure of Conservatism in Modern British Poetry, Andrew Duncan

The Failure of Conservatism in Modern British Poetry,

Andrew Duncan

- £24.99
A treatment of 40 years of British poetry from the angle of time. We watch the wonderful helplessness of new poetics as it struggles to free itself from the chrysalis of the old. We watch the life-cycle of new ideas as they open up chaos, channel it into permanent form, and age into predictability and disillusion. We realise the strangeness of the past and go in to sample lost sounds and exotic shapes.
Origins of the Underground, Andrew Duncan

Origins of the Underground,

Andrew Duncan

- £24.99
This isn’t a one-volume history of post-War British poetry. Given the mass of writing about the post-War period, Duncan like a footballer, says he must “go for space”. He has selectively gathered unfamiliar information. As he says, “Generally, if you read ten books on recent literary history you do find that they do all say the same things. This makes reading them a wearing experience. I intend to bang on until you complain about me including too much.”
Donít Start Me Talking, Tim Allen & Andrew Duncan

Donít Start Me Talking,

Tim Allen & Andrew Duncan

- £16.99
How unexpected – to try to find out about modern poetry by getting the poets, 20 of them, to talk about what they do. Special attention has been given to groups of poets sharing creative ideas with each other, and to regional scenes – much information will be found about poetic activity in Plymouth, Manchester, and Glasgow. Two generations of poets have their say, running down poetic matters from the Cuban Missile Crisis to the razing of Baghdad, from The English Intelligencer to Cul de Qui.
 
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